The Journal Gazette
 
 
Friday, October 23, 2020 1:00 am

Movie review

'Borat' return hits mark 14 years after original

JAKE COYLE | Associated Press

'Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan' ★★★

Since Sacha Baron Cohen first appeared as his Kazakh journalist on “Da Ali G Show,” Borat Sagdiyev has been remarkably consistent. The accent is the same. The gray suit is still rumpled. “Nahce” and “Mah Wahfe” regularly exude from him with a mangled melody. Borat hasn't changed in the last 20 years. But America has.

When Baron Cohen last traipsed across the country as Borat, in 2006's “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan,” his character's unapologetic anti-Semitism, misogyny and racism teased prejudices out from all kinds of dark and not-so-dark corners. His comedy revealed a more disturbing, hidden America that was often happy to go along with Baron Cohen's gonzo act. Fourteen years later, those prejudices aren't so hard to find. Borat fits right in.

In “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan” – Baron Cohen's October surprise, shot secretly earlier this year and debuting today on Amazon Prime Video – Borat returns to the U.S., like a deranged Alexis de Tocqueville, for another look.

It takes a little while to get going. Borat doesn't have the free rein he once did, and not just because of the restrictions of the pandemic. He's hounded on the streets by cell phone-waving fans asking for a picture, and has to resort to a coterie of disguises. His trail of fiascos this time is a little more limited but no less damning. The “Borat” sequel will make you laugh and squirm as much as it will send shudders down your spine.

Jason Woliner, a TV veteran and frequent collaborator with Aziz Ansari taking over as director for Larry Charles, begins by catching us up on Borat. Locked away in the gulag for bringing shame on Kazakhstan with the first movie, Borat is temporarily freed for a mission to deliver a gift to Trump (Borat refers to him, admiringly, as “McDonald Trump”). Given his past encounters with the president (Baron Cohen's Ali G interviewed him; Borat previously defecated in front of a Trump building), it's judged best to instead seek out who Borat calls “America's most famous ladies man,” Vice President Mike Pence.

Borat arrives via shipping container in Galveston, Texas, only to find that the monkey meant for Pence is dead and his daughter Tutor (played by Bulgarian actress Maria Bakalova), last seen chained alongside farm animals, has stowed away. They'll remain paired throughout the film in a journey through America and Borat's own over-the-top sexism. This “Borat” is, in its own absurd way, a #MeToo movie.


Sign up for our daily headlines newsletter

Top headlines are sent daily