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The Journal Gazette

  • Photos by Mike Moore | The Journal Gazette Walter Majewski, 4, takes a close look at the troll after walking over his bridge Saturday at the Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory. 

  • Parents and children play the Winter Garden Fairy Tales Exhibit on Saturday at the conservatory downtown. To learn more, go to www.botanicalconservatory.org.

  • Mike Moore | The Journal Gazette Ainslee Davis, left, and Zeiss Knowlton play inside Grandma's house at the Winter Garden "Fairy Tales" Exhibit on display at Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory on Saturday.  

  • Mike Moore | The Journal Gazette Ainslee Davis, 3 plays inside Grandma's house at the Winter Garden "Fairy Tales" Exhibit on display at Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory on Saturday.  

  • Mike Moore | The Journal Gazette Walter Majewski, 4, walks over the troll's bridge at the Winter Garden "Fairy Tales" Exhibit on display at Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory on Saturday.  

Sunday, January 14, 2018 1:00 am

Kids, adults experience favorite tales

MATTHEW LEBLANC | The Journal Gazette

Escaping temperatures in the 20s Saturday, Cheri and Mike Crawshaw and their grandson, Bradley, entered a world of make-believe.

That world was conveniently located downtown, at the Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory.

“We bring him here quite a bit in the winter,” Mike Crawshaw said.

“It's so pretty,” Cheri Crawshaw said. “It's like we're in a different world here.”

In a way, they were.

Saturday marked the start of the conservatory's annual Winter Garden exhibit. The theme this year: Fairy Tales.

A playground near the center of the building featured a large frog from the story of the Frog Prince. Nearby, children crossed a bridge from Three Billy Goats Gruff. And out of a tower from Rapunzel flowed the title character's blond, braided ponytail.

The conservatory converts its Showcase Garden to a play space for children each winter. Past themes included Mary Poppins and Peter Pan.

Rebecca Canales, the facility's supervisor of programming and volunteer development, said organizers look for themes tied to literature, to promote literacy. It's a family-friendly attraction, she said, that has run for more than a decade.

“If there's something family-friendly – they have an incentive to come,” Canales said.

Bradley didn't need an incentive. He said he likes going to the conservatory to look at the flowers.

His grandparents do, too.

“It's so great,” Cheri Crawshaw said. “It's really cool.”

The Fairy Tales exhibit runs through April 8.

mleblanc@jg.net