The Journal Gazette
 
 
Tuesday, September 21, 2021 1:00 am

US officials defend expelling Haitians from Texas town

Associated Press

DEL RIO, Texas – More than 6,000 Haitians and other migrants have been removed from an encampment at a Texas border town, U.S. officials said Monday as they defended a strong response that included immediately expelling migrants to their impoverished Caribbean country and using horse patrols to stop them from entering the town.

Calling it a “challenging and heartbreaking situation,” Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas issued a stark warning: “If you come to the United States illegally, you will be returned. Your journey will not succeed, and you will be endangering your life and your family's life.”

Isaac Isner, 30, and his wife Mirdege, took wet clothing off their 3-year-old daughter Isadora after crossing the Rio Grande to Ciudad Acuņa, Mexico, Monday afternoon. They had been in Del Rio, Texas, for seven days but decided to return to Mexico after a friend showed cellphone video of the U.S. expelling migrants.

“They were putting people on a bus and sent them to Haiti just like that without signing anything,” Isner said.

His family has an appointment this month with Mexico's asylum agency in the southern city of Tapachula, and they think they could be safe in Mexico.

Most migrants, however, still haven't made up their minds.

“We don't know what we're going to do,” said a second Haitian man, who declined to give his name but said he crossed into Mexico Monday for food, leaving his wife and child in Del Rio. “The U.S. is deporting and now Mexico won't just sit back and do nothing. We don't know where to go.”

Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico's foreign minister, said about 15% of the Haitian migrants in Mexico have accepted refuge there. So far this year, about 19,000 Haitian migrants have requested asylum in Mexico.

“Mexico does not have any problem with them being in our country as long as they respect Mexico's laws,” he said.

Mexico was busing Haitian migrants from Ciudad Acuņa on Sunday evening, according to Luis Angel Urraza, president of the local chamber of commerce.

Mayorkas and U.S. Border Patrol Chief Raul Ortiz said they would look into agents on horseback using what appeared to be whips and their horses to push back migrants at the river between Ciudad Acuņa and Del Rio, a city of about 35,000 people roughly 145 miles west of San Antonio where thousands of migrants remain camped around a bridge.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats launched an uphill fight Monday to rescue their drive to help millions of immigrants remain legally in the U.S., their pathway unclear and the uncertainty exposing tensions between party leaders and progressive groups demanding bold results.

Lawmakers and advocacy organizations said they were already weighing fresh options, a day after the Senate parliamentarian said their sweeping proposal must fall from a $3.5 trillion measure that's shielded against bill-killing Republican filibusters. But it seemed strongly likely that Democrats might have to winnow their measure to help fewer than the 8 million immigrants they envisioned, and even then faced daunting prospects to prevail.

The ruling by the nonpartisan parliamentarian, Elizabeth MacDonough, was a jarring blow because without the procedural protections, Democrats in the 50-50 Senate lack the 60 votes required to end those GOP delays and approve immigration legislation.

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